The Global Product Stewardship Council

Emerging Global EPR Best Practices for Packaging

Posted by GlobalPSC in Member Profiles at 4:58 pm, March 31st, 2014

A new study of 11 international extended producer responsibility (EPR) and product stewardship programs for packaging and printed paper (PPP) has preliminarily identified a series of emerging global best practices to help optimize and harmonize solutions for managing packaging waste.

The report was led by the Product Stewardship Institute (PSI) in association with PAC NEXT to help industry and government work together to find ways to reduce cost and regulatory complexity in existing and potential EPR programs for PPP.

“The preliminary findings of our research underscore what we at PSI have always believed: that, within the context of product stewardship, the most successful materials management programs often incorporate a combination of legislative and voluntary strategies,” said Scott Cassel, Chief Executive Officer of PSI and a member of the GlobalPSC Executive Committee. “The program summaries provided in this report offer a wealth of data for government agencies and industry groups around the world to evaluate, and we look forward to using this information as a springboard for critical stakeholder dialogues.”

The report examines EPR programs in Canada (Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba, and British Columbia); Europe (Belgium, France, Austria, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom); and Australia. Based on an initial assessment of the data collected on these programs, PAC NEXT and PSI concluded that “the following attributes, when present together, can constitute a high performing EPR program:

  • The program covers residential, public, as well as industrial, commercial and institutional (IC+I) sources;
  • The program covers all material types (including printed paper);
  • The cost per ton is low;
  • Collection and recycling rates are high;
  • The value and quality of materials are high;
  • The program is convenient for residents and others;
  • Producers take full responsibility for post-consumer packaging management”.

“What this report has allowed us to do is develop an understanding of how EPR programs for packaging around the world operate – what they share in common, what they do different, what works, what could use some improvement,” said Jennifer Holliday, president of PSI’s board of directors. “It is our hope that these findings enable industry and government to collaborate on ways to harmonize packaging waste solutions.”

Also based on the data, PSI and PAC NEXT identified the following policies as “complementary to EPR, playing an important role in increasing the performance of packaging collection and recycling systems:

  • Pay-as-you-throw (PAYT) programs;
  • Mandatory recycling requirements;
  • Landfill bans for recyclable materials; and
  • Container deposit programs”.

The GlobalPSC provided program analysis in support of the study.

GlobalPSC News – March 2014

Posted by GlobalPSC in Uncategorized at 2:17 pm, March 31st, 2014

GlobalPSC Launches New Themes to be Explored with Members

Last week in Singapore, the GlobalPSC launched a series of themes to enable decision makers to more effectively draw upon international experience in product stewardship policy and to help raise the standards of recycling programs globally.

The roundtable discussions, hosted jointly by the GlobalPSC and Infoactiv at the Shangri-La Hotel Singapore, addressed a broad range of chemicals and products amongst key stakeholders including BASF, HP, Apple, Shell and CropLife Asia.

GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin provided a global overview of product stewardship and extended producer responsibility programs then launched the themes being examined by the GlobalPSC, which include:

  • Making meaningful comparisons between programs (especially for recycling rates and key performance measures)
  • The importance of responsible recycling
  • The future of product stewardship
  • Competition amongst producer responsibility organisations and service providers

The GlobalPSC will be refining and prioritising the themes in consultation with GlobalPSC members and sharing results through a variety of approaches, including GlobalPSC analysis, guest blogs (such as the recent guest blog on responsible recycling by R2 Solutions Board Member and former Senior Policy Advisor for the US EPA, Clare Lindsay) and social media, including discussions in LinkedIn. GlobalPSC members will be contacted over the next few weeks with specifics. These efforts will be assisted by product stewardship expert Marra Teasdale from her base in Singapore.

The Singapore roundtable was facilitated by Chris Mason and John Gertsakis from Infoactiv, and covered a range of key issues across the product life-cycle from Design for Environment and Cleaner Production through to product use and end-of-life management. Infoactiv’s focus during discussions was to explore the critical importance of regional priorities and cultural sensitivity given the diversity of countries and issues across the Asia Pacific region. The roundtable highlighted that the definition and application of Product Stewardship and EPR can vary dramatically mindful of context, culture and environmental priorities.

 

Emerging Global EPR Best Practices for Packaging

A new study of 11 international extended producer responsibility (EPR) and product stewardship programs for packaging and printed paper (PPP) has preliminarily identified a series of emerging global best practices to help optimize and harmonize solutions for managing packaging waste.

The report was led by the Product Stewardship Institute (PSI) in association with PAC NEXT to help industry and government work together to find ways to reduce cost and regulatory complexity in existing and potential EPR programs for PPP.

“The preliminary findings of our research underscore what we at PSI have always believed: that, within the context of product stewardship, the most successful materials management programs often incorporate a combination of legislative and voluntary strategies,” said Scott Cassel, Chief Executive Officer of PSI and a member of the GlobalPSC Executive Committee. “The program summaries provided in this report offer a wealth of data for government agencies and industry groups around the world to evaluate, and we look forward to using this information as a springboard for critical stakeholder dialogues.”

The report examines EPR programs in Canada (Ontario, Quebec, Manitoba, and British Columbia); Europe (Belgium, France, Austria, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom); and Australia. Based on an initial assessment of the data collected on these programs, PAC NEXT and PSI concluded that “the following attributes, when present together, can constitute a high performing EPR program:

  • The program covers residential, public, as well as industrial, commercial and institutional (IC+I) sources;
  • The program covers all material types (including printed paper);
  • The cost per ton is low;
  • Collection and recycling rates are high;
  • The value and quality of materials are high;
  • The program is convenient for residents and others;
  • Producers take full responsibility for post-consumer packaging management”.

“What this report has allowed us to do is develop an understanding of how EPR programs for packaging around the world operate – what they share in common, what they do different, what works, what could use some improvement,” said Jennifer Holliday, president of PSI’s board of directors. “It is our hope that these findings enable industry and government to collaborate on ways to harmonize packaging waste solutions.”

Also based on the data, PSI and PAC NEXT identified the following policies as “complementary to EPR, playing an important role in increasing the performance of packaging collection and recycling systems:

  • Pay-as-you-throw (PAYT) programs;
  • Mandatory recycling requirements;
  • Landfill bans for recyclable materials; and
  • Container deposit programs”.

The GlobalPSC provided program analysis in support of the study.

 

First Year Outcomes for Australia’s National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme

Australia has released a report on the first year outcomes of its National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (NTCRS or Scheme).

Reports have also been made publicly available for the three approved co-regulatory arrangements that were operational in 2012–13: DHL Supply Chain (Australia) Pty Limited, the Australia and New Zealand Recycling Platform Limited (ANZRP) and E-Cycle Solutions Pty Ltd. Two of the three approved co-regulatory arrangements, DHL Supply Chain and TechCollect/ANZRP, are GlobalPSC Sustaining Corporate members.

According to the Australian Government’s Department of the Environment, a Government member of the GlobalPSC:

“A total of 635 collection services, including drop off points at major electronics retailers and local government and other waste facilities, as well as temporary collection events, were provided by the three co-regulatory arrangements between the commencement of the Scheme and the end of June 2013.

“An estimated total of 137,756 tonnes of televisions and computers reached end of life in Australia in 2012–13. Industry’s target under the scheme was to recycle 30 per cent of this amount, or 41,327 tonnes. A total of 40,813 tonnes of recycling was achieved, equivalent to 98.8 per cent of the scheme target and almost double the estimated level of recycling prior to the scheme’s introduction. DHL Supply Chain and E-Cycle Solutions exceeded their recycling targets, while ANZRP fell short of its recycling target. E-waste not covered by the scheme target remained the responsibility of state, territory and local governments. National data is not available on the amount of e-waste recycling that occurred outside the scheme in 2012–13.”

 

Report: Cost-Benefit Study of Extended Producer Responsibility for Packaging and Printed Paper

A cost-benefit study conducted for Recycling Reinvented by Reclay StewardEdge has estimated the total cost of an extended producer responsibility (EPR) model system for consumer packaging and printed paper (PPP) in the US state of Minnesota at US$74.2 million, or an average of US$117 per ton of PPP recycled under the program. System costs for Minnesota’s residential recycling in 2011 are estimated to range between US$61 million and US$74 million, or US$149-182 per ton collected. According to the report, the “estimates suggest that the modeled EPR system could result in a substantial increase in projected tons of consumer PPP collected within approximately the same spending range as under the current system”.

A previous report in the three report series showed that Minnesota could see a 32% increase in recycling of PPP by using an EPR model incorporating harmonization of materials collection, increased single-stream collection, slightly more curbside collection, and an away-from-home recycling program. A statewide recycling rate of 61% could be achieved for recyclable consumer PPP, and a higher rate is possible for household PPP.

The study modeled the effects of EPR in a single state using state-specific data, but Recycling Reinvented hope that the methodology and analysis findings will have broader applicability. The goal of the study is to help advance the national dialogue on how to achieve higher recycling rates, greater system efficiency, and sustainably financed recycling programs.

The first working paper in the series presented the study design, guiding principles, and assumptions. The website MarketBasedRecycling.com was created to house all details of the study for more in-depth information.

Although commissioned by Recycling Reinvented, the study was designed to be objective, rigorous, and transparent. It included an extensive review process by over two dozen experts from industry, non-governmental organizations, education and policy.

 

New GlobalPSC Members and Member Profiles

 

Events Update

The Global Product Stewardship Council is presenting at the following events:

  • 40th Annual RCBC Zero Waste Conference, 28-30 May 2014 in Whistler, Canada
  • WasteMET Asia, 2-4 June 2014 in Singapore

At these events, we will be promoting the involvement of GlobalPSC members and our activities.

Report: Cost-Benefit Study of Extended Producer Responsibility for Packaging and Printed Paper

Posted by GlobalPSC in Member Profiles at 10:49 am, March 31st, 2014

 

 

 

cost-benefit study conducted for Recycling Reinvented by Reclay StewardEdge has estimated the total cost of an extended producer responsibility (EPR) model system for consumer packaging and printed paper (PPP) in the US state of Minnesota at US$74.2 million, or an average of US$117 per ton of PPP recycled under the program. System costs for Minnesota’s residential recycling in 2011 are estimated to range between US$61 million and US$74 million, or US$149-182 per ton collected. According to the report, the “estimates suggest that the modeled EPR system could result in a substantial increase in projected tons of consumer PPP collected within approximately the same spending range as under the current system”.

A previous report in the three report series showed that Minnesota could see a 32% increase in recycling of PPP by using an EPR model incorporating harmonization of materials collection, increased single-stream collection, slightly more curbside collection, and an away-from-home recycling program. A statewide recycling rate of 61% could be achieved for recyclable consumer PPP, and a higher rate is possible for household PPP.

The study modeled the effects of EPR in a single state using state-specific data, but Recycling Reinvented hope that the methodology and analysis findings will have broader applicability. The goal of the study is to help advance the national dialogue on how to achieve higher recycling rates, greater system efficiency, and sustainably financed recycling programs.

The first working paper in the series presented the study design, guiding principles, and assumptions. The website MarketBasedRecycling.com was created to house all details of the study for more in-depth information.

Although commissioned by Recycling Reinvented, the study was designed to be objective, rigorous, and transparent. It included an extensive review process by over two dozen experts from industry, non-governmental organizations, education and policy.

First Year Outcomes for Australia’s National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme

Posted by GlobalPSC in E-waste / WEEE, Member Profiles at 8:59 am, March 31st, 2014

Australia has released a report on the first year outcomes of its National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (NTCRS or Scheme).

Reports have also been made publicly available for the three approved co-regulatory arrangements that were operational in 2012–13: DHL Supply Chain (Australia) Pty Limited, the Australia and New Zealand Recycling Platform Limited (ANZRP) and E-Cycle Solutions Pty Ltd. Two of the three approved co-regulatory arrangements, DHL Supply Chain and TechCollect/ANZRP, are GlobalPSC Sustaining Corporate members.

According to the Australian Government’s Department of the Environment, a Government member of the GlobalPSC:

“A total of 635 collection services, including drop off points at major electronics retailers and local government and other waste facilities, as well as temporary collection events, were provided by the three co-regulatory arrangements between the commencement of the Scheme and the end of June 2013.

“An estimated total of 137,756 tonnes of televisions and computers reached end of life in Australia in 2012–13. Industry’s target under the scheme was to recycle 30 per cent of this amount, or 41,327 tonnes. A total of 40,813 tonnes of recycling was achieved, equivalent to 98.8 per cent of the scheme target and almost double the estimated level of recycling prior to the scheme’s introduction. DHL Supply Chain and E-Cycle Solutions exceeded their recycling targets, while ANZRP fell short of its recycling target. E-waste not covered by the scheme target remained the responsibility of state, territory and local governments. National data is not available on the amount of e-waste recycling that occurred outside the scheme in 2012–13.”

GlobalPSC Launches Key Themes to be Explored with Members

Posted by GlobalPSC in Events, News at 7:39 pm, March 25th, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

Singapore – The Global Product Stewardship Council today announced a series of themes to enable decision makers to more effectively draw upon international experience in product stewardship policy and to help raise the standards of recycling programs globally.

The roundtable discussions, hosted jointly by the GlobalPSC and Infoactiv at the Shangri-La Hotel Singapore, addressed a broad range of chemicals and products amongst key stakeholders including BASF, HP, Apple, Shell and CropLife Asia.

GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin provided a global overview of product stewardship and extended producer responsibility programs then launched the themes being examined by the GlobalPSC, which include:

  • Making meaningful comparisons between programs (especially for recycling rates and key performance measures)
  • The importance of responsible recycling
  • The future of product stewardship
  • Competition amongst producer responsibility organisations and service providers

The GlobalPSC will be refining and prioritising the themes in consultation with GlobalPSC members and sharing results through a variety of approaches. These efforts will be assisted by product stewardship expert Marra Teasdale from her base in Singapore.

The Singapore roundtable was facilitated by Chris Mason and John Gertsakis from Infoactiv, and covered a range of key issues across the product life-cycle from Design for Environment and Cleaner Production through to product use and end-of-life management. Infoactiv’s focus during discussions was to explore the critical importance of regional priorities and cultural sensitivity given the diversity of countries and issues across the Asia Pacific region. The roundtable highlighted that the definition and application of Product Stewardship and EPR can vary dramatically mindful of context, culture and environmental priorities.

Guest Blog – Responsible Recycling for Electronics Sees Major Gains

Posted by GlobalPSC in Guest Blogs at 5:51 am, March 14th, 2014

The Global Product Stewardship Council periodically invites thought leaders on product stewardship and producer responsibility to contribute guest blogs. Our guest blogger for this post is Clare Lindsay, Board Member of R2 Solutions and former Senior Policy Advisor and Project Director for Product Stewardship in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

The digital revolution has led to unprecedented changes in the way we work, communicate and live our lives. However, this breakneck pace of technological advancement over the past several decades has produced an unintended side-effect: a rapidly increasing volume of used electronics.

The world’s 7 billion people now generate an average of 15 pounds of used electronics per person, per year, with that amount expected to increase over 33% by the end of the decade. Developed nations, such as the United States, are leaders in discarding used electronics, but many emerging economies, such as Brazil, India and China, are rapidly eclipsing many other nations. In fact, based on the most recent numbers from an organization sponsored by United Nations University, Solving the E-waste Problem (StEP), China now generates more discarded electronics per year than the United States, making it the world leader.

Many electronic items can be repaired and reused in second hand markets in the developed or developing world. Additionally, almost all electronics are recyclable, containing valuable metals and plastics that when separated can be resold as useful commodities. Unfortunately, many electronics are not recycled, instead finding their way into landfills or other disposal channels where rudimentary practices can cause serious human health and environmental harm.

In response to these challenges, a coalition of stakeholders including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, electronics manufacturers, major retailers, NGOs, electronics refurbishers and recyclers, and others, created the Responsible Recycling (R2) standard for safe, environmentally sustainable management of used electronics. Developed through a transparent, consensus-based process, the goal of the R2 standard was to develop a voluntary, market-based mechanism for expanding and encouraging the use of best practices for electronics refurbishing and recycling.

Responsible electronics recycling practices ensure that used electronics are handled in a way that encourages repair and reuse, safely reclaims metals, plastics and other materials for commodity resale, and guards against human health issues and environmental contamination brought on by improper recovery and disposal. R2 certification has been integral to the growth of responsible recycling worldwide and new changes to the standard aim to take these principles even further.

The R2 standard begins 2014 with incredible momentum. Over 500 facilities in 14 countries are now R2 certified with more becoming certified every week. Last July’s release of R2:2013, the first major update to the original R2 standard, added increased record keeping and reporting requirements, mandated certification to generally-accepted environmental health and safety requirements, and tightened requirements regarding how facilities that refurbish and recycle electronics address some of the most pressing environmental and human health risks associated with managing used electronics.

The R2:2013 standard specifically addresses these challenges:

  • Reuse and refurbishment – Refurbishment and reuse is considered, in most instances, the greenest way to manage used electronics, offering a second (or third) chance to use an item before it is disposed. R2:2013 adopts a hierarchy for managing equipment that prioritizes reuse and refurbishment. Certified recyclers are required to take all practical steps to divert tested and working electronics to repair and resale channels. This requires the use of rigorous testing procedures, sanitizing data, labeling and sorting equipment based on condition, and properly packing equipment for transport.
  • Data security – Data security breaches risk billions of dollars in liabilities and losses each year, with unauthorized access to used devices among the leading causes of data security incidents. R2:2013 certified recyclers are required to sanitize or destroy data to NIST 800-88, ADISA, or NAID specifications, document their processes, and keep appropriate records. Additionally, certified recyclers are required to implement training procedures for their employees and submit to periodic review by independent auditors of their data security practices.
  • Environmental health and safety – Electronic devices can contain lead, mercury, cadmium, and other potentially toxic materials. If not managed correctly, these materials can contaminate soil and water supplies, or adversely affect the health of workers in recycling facilities or people in surrounding communities. R2:2013 requires that certified recycling facilities have a written environmental health and safety management plan, as well as implement and regularly test workplace safety and environmental controls. Additionally, facilities are required to implement a quality assurance plan and policy, and be certified to either RIOS (a recycling specific health and safety standard for electronics recyclers) or both ISO 14001 and OHSAS 18001.

The enhanced standard also provides a foundation for many exciting new programs and services that will benefit recyclers and improve the operating environment for electronics recycling. R2 Solutions has hired a Director of Quality to work with recyclers and refurbishers, and auditors, to better understand and implement the requirements of R2:2013. In addition, R2 Solutions will be doing to more to improve how certifying bodies conduct and follow up on the audits required for recyclers to obtain and retain their R2 certification. R2 Solutions is working to develop new support tools for recyclers and auditors that it will be rolling out over the coming months.

This is an important time for R2 certification and more broadly, sustainable electronics recycling. Over the course of the next year, the over 500 companies currently R2 certified will upgrade to the new R2:2013 standard. As of the end of January 2014, several trailblazing facilities have already successfully upgraded to R2:2013. R2 Solutions is excited about the continuing growth and development of the R2 standard and is looking forward to further expanding the reach of the standard to electronic refurbishing and recycling facilities around the world.

The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Global Product Stewardship Council.

Clare Lindsay recently retired from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, DC, after a 20 year career focused on resource conservation and materials management.  As Senior Policy Advisor and Project Director for Product Stewardship in EPAs Office of Resource Conservation and Recovery, Ms. Lindsay led EPAs efforts to initiate the first national dialogue in the United States on electronics product stewardship and takeback. This initiative catalyzed and informed action by numerous states that have since enacted electronics takeback laws.  Ms. Lindsay also advised and helped develop many other stewardship initiatives addressing packaging, carpet, office furniture, and paint.

Currently, Ms. Lindsay serves on the Board of R2 Solutions. She is also Chairman of the Board of the National Center for Electronics Recycling, a non-profit organization dedicated to the development and enhancement of a national infrastructure for the management of used electronics in the United States.

Proposed Scheme Released for National Battery Product Stewardship Approach in Australia

Posted by GlobalPSC in Batteries at 3:05 pm, March 7th, 2014

The Battery Implementation Working Group (BIWG) tasked with developing a national handheld battery product stewardship scheme for Australia has today released a discussion paper for consultation as well as a project communique on efforts to date. Consultation on the proposed scheme is open until 31 March.

Australian, state and territory governments have made product stewardship for handheld batteries a national priority and dedicated resources to the development of an appropriate scheme, including project funding and the establishment of the BIWG, with bipartisan support.

The discussion paper outlines a proposed voluntary, industry-led national Battery Product Stewardship Scheme (Scheme) for Australia, along with a number of options for the operation of the Scheme. The proposed Scheme would apply to all handheld batteries less than 5 kg, with the exception of embedded batteries, and comprise the following elements:

  • A Battery Stewardship Agreement that would provide a collective written commitment between stewards for developing, funding and implementing the Scheme.
  • A 5-year Strategic Plan to be developed jointly by the producer responsibility organisation (PRO) and stewards that would provide more detail for how the PRO and stewards will implement the Scheme in accordance with the Agreement.
  • Transparent annual reporting of performance against the Strategic Plan.
  • Importers seeking to meet the objectives of the Agreement through their own arrangement rather than through an industry-wide PRO would be expected to deliver a comparable Strategic Plan and annual reports to Stewards under the Agreement.

As a voluntary, industry-led national approach, the proposed Scheme is open to a broad range of stakeholders and has the benefits of simplicity of design, reduced barriers to participation and ease of understanding. The proposed Scheme would provide more immediate action with lower costs and greater certainty compared to immediate pursuit of a co-regulatory approach. Stakeholders that are already implementing collection programs or are likely to do so in the near future can be better recognised for their early action. A voluntary approach provides the flexibility to modify and improve the Scheme in order to improve performance and reduce costs, especially in the first few years of implementation.

It is envisaged that importers of handheld batteries would have primary financial responsibility for funding the Scheme, although it is recognised that other parties may make additional direct or in-kind contributions. Other parties may have roles as stewards, for example, by providing collection facilities at point-of-sale or at local council waste management sites. Options considered are provided in the discussion paper.

The Global Product Stewardship Council and GlobalPSC members have been active throughout the process:

GlobalPSC Member – R2 Solutions

Posted by GlobalPSC in Member Profiles at 11:20 am, March 7th, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many electronic items can be repaired and reused in second hand markets in the developed or developing world. Additionally, almost all electronics are recyclable, containing valuable metals and plastics that when separated can be resold as useful commodities. Unfortunately, many electronics are not recycled, instead finding their way into landfills or other disposal channels where rudimentary practices can cause serious human health and environmental harm.

In response to these challenges, a coalition of stakeholders including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, electronics manufacturers, major retailers, NGOs, electronics refurbishers and recyclers, and others, created the Responsible Recycling (R2) standard for safe, environmentally sustainable management of used electronics. Developed through a transparent, consensus-based process, the goal of the R2 standard was to develop a voluntary, market-based mechanism for expanding and encouraging the use of best practices for electronics refurbishing and recycling.

Responsible electronics recycling practices ensure that used electronics are handled in a way that encourages repair and reuse, safely reclaims metals, plastics and other materials for commodity resale, and guards against human health issues and environmental contamination brought on by improper recovery and disposal. R2 certification has been integral to the growth of responsible recycling worldwide and new changes to the standard aim to take these principles even further.

The R2 standard begins 2014 with incredible momentum. Over 500 facilities in 14 countries are now R2 certified with more becoming certified every week. Last July’s release of R2:2013, the first major update to the original R2 standard, added increased record keeping and reporting requirements, mandated certification to generally-accepted environmental health and safety requirements, and tightened requirements regarding how facilities that refurbish and recycle electronics address some of the most pressing environmental and human health risks associated with managing used electronics.

GlobalPSC Government Member – Queensland Department of Environment and Heritage Protection

Posted by GlobalPSC in Member Profiles at 10:18 am, March 7th, 2014

 

 

 

 

The Department of Environment and Heritage Protection administers the Waste Reduction and Recycling Act 2011, which provides a framework for waste management and resource recovery in Queensland, Australia. Among other things, the Act provides for the development of product stewardship schemes for products of priority for Queensland. The Department also supports national product stewardship initiatives and provides the Secretariat support for the current program of work on the development of a handheld battery product stewardship scheme. More information on Queensland’s waste management and resource recovery agenda and legislation can be found here.

GlobalPSC Member – Helen Lewis Research

Posted by GlobalPSC in Member Profiles at 9:39 am, March 7th, 2014

Dr Helen Lewis, founder of Helen Lewis Research, is an environmental consultant with a focus on product stewardship and packaging sustainability.

She works for a variety of clients in government and the private sector to promote design for sustainability and increased recovery of products and packaging at end of life.

Helen has been the Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Battery Recycling Initiative (ABRI) since early 2010. She has also worked closely with the Australian Packaging Covenant (APC) since its inception on capacity building projects including delivery of workshops, guidelines and industry case studies.

Helen is an Adjunct Professor at RMIT University and a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP). She is co-author of:

  • ‘Packaging for Sustainability’, with Karli Verghese and Leanne Fitzpatrick (Springer, 2012)
  • ‘Design + Environment’, with John Gertsakis (Greenleaf, 2001).
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