The Global Product Stewardship Council

PVC Stewardship Program 2014 Results

Posted by GlobalPSC in Member Profiles at 10:40 am, June 18th, 2015

PVCSshipVertLogoColGradCMYK0615The PVC Product Stewardship Program is a voluntary initiative  launched by the Vinyl Council of Australia in 2002. The 2014 Annual Report recently released for the Program shows increased commitment from signatories and a 50 percent increase in the number of companies in the Australian vinyl industry reporting actions to improve energy efficiencies on site, monitoring carbon emission or setting targets to reduce energy consumption.

The Program aims to improve the sustainability of vinyl, or PVC, products by delivering change across the life cycle of PVC. Signatories include local manufacturers and importers of a wide range of products – pipes, conduit, cable, flooring, windows, building profiles, flexible packaging, fabrics and medical products – as well as suppliers of raw materials and intermediates.

The Program is structured around five specific aspects of the life cycle of PVC products: best practice manufacturing, safe and sustainable use of additives, energy and greenhouse gas management, resource efficiency, and transparency and engagement.

According to the report, more than two thirds of signatory companies are now complying with the industry’s ‘Energy Efficiency & Greenhouse Gas Charter’. The Charter, introduced into the industry’s long-running PVC Stewardship Program three years ago, formally commits businesses to improve energy efficiency at the warehouse, distribution and manufacturing level, and to reduce the carbon footprint of their operations, and ultimately, their products.

 

GlobalPSC News – May 2015

Posted by GlobalPSC in Uncategorized at 3:12 pm, May 29th, 2015

Please note that with a recent office move, our new landline is +61 2 9449 9909.

Our new fax number is +61 2 9449 9901. Other details remain unchanged.

 

U.S. Supreme Court Paves Way for Drug Take-back Law

iStock_000016423595Large

The U.S. Supreme Court has decided not to hear a challenge to the constitutionality of Alameda County, California’s drug disposal law, which was the first of its kind in requiring drug manufacturers to fund and manage the safe disposal of unwanted medications.

The Supreme Court denied certiorari in a case brought by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), the Generic Pharmaceutical Association and the Biotechnology Industry Organization. The decision means that the Alameda County ordinance will stand, along with similar laws passed in San Francisco, California; San Mateo, California; and King County, Washington.

The Product Stewardship Institute has prepared a fact sheet exploring the implications of the Supreme Court decision and another fact sheet outlining the history behind the case.

 

Africa’s First Bottle-to-Bottle Recycling Plant Opens

Africa’s first bottle-to-bottle recycling plant was officially opened this May by Minister of Environmental Affairs Edna Molewa in Wadeville, Johannesburg. The plant is the first in Africa to use a Coca-Cola approved technology for carbonated soft drink bottles, thus enabling closing the loop in the biggest sector of the beverage market.

The 3,000 square metre PhoenixPET plant installed by Extrupet will supply an additional 14,000 tonnes of PET resin per year to the PET packaging industry. It will eventually divert an additional 22,000 tonnes of post-consumer PET bottles from landfills. The plant involves investment of R75 million.

Minister Molewa was joined at the opening ceremony by notable guests from government and the PET industry including (L-R): Ravi Chanrai (Extrupet), Therese Gearhart (Coca-Cola Southern Africa), Laju Chanrai (Extrupet), Minister of Environmental Affairs Edna Molewa, Her Excellency Ruchi Ghanashyam (Indian High Commission), Cheri Scholtz (CEO of PETCO and GlobalPSC Advisory Group member), Vijay Naidoo (Extrupet), Randhir Jaiswal (Indian High Commission) and Chandru Wadhwani (Extrupet).

PETCO CEO Cheri Scholtz notes, ‘The cooperation within the PET industry to reach a common goal of integrating recycling into product life cycles is showing very notable results: we have reached a point where 49% of all post-consumer PET bottles are currently recycled – no less than 1.5 billion bottles were recycled in 2014, supporting 44,000 informal income opportunities in PET collection’.

 

Call2Recycle 2014 Annual Report

Call2Recycle®, North America’s most successful battery collection program, has released its 2014 Annual Report. Call2Recycle attributes their 20 years of growth directly back to the investment of time, money and ideas by their stewards, partners and stakeholders. Two historic milestones are noted for 2014: cumulative battery collections of 100 million pounds (45 million kilograms) and 18 years of year-over-year increases in the volume of batteries collected. Other highlights include:

  • In 2014, Call2Recycle diverted nearly 12 million pounds (5.4 million kilograms) of batteries and cellphones from landfills
  • Battery collections in California topped more than 1 million pounds (454,000 kilograms) for the 3rd straight year
  • Collections in Canada reached over 2.2 million kilograms (4.4 million pounds) of batteries collected, and the provinces of British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec recorded double-digit collection growth

 

Dana Peterson Appointed to GlobalPSC Advisory Group

We are proud to announce the appointment of an esteemed colleague, Dana Peterson, to the GlobalPSC Advisory Group.

The GlobalPSC and a number of our Executive Committee members have worked closely with Dana over the years, and she brings a wealth of experience to this new role on our Advisory Group.

Dana is a Senior Analyst with New Zealand’s Ministry for the Environment. She has been actively involved in promoting sustainability and resource efficiency in a variety of government roles since 1984. In 2012-2013 she was the government representative in two stakeholder-led product stewardship working parties, the Agrichemicals Review and Tyrewise, and in 2014 was the principal author of government’s public discussion document Priority Waste Streams for Product Stewardship Intervention. She has presented at a number of international conferences on product stewardship and sustainable procurement in Europe and Asia, and served as New Zealand’s representative on an OECD environmental management country review of Norway (focus on waste). At home, she does hands-on organic farming and native forest regeneration on 10 acres on the Kapiti Coast.

 

Guest Blog – E-waste Targets Must Go Up
john_gertsakis

The Global Product Stewardship Council periodically invites thought leaders on product stewardship and producer responsibility to contribute guest blogs. Our guest blogger for this post is John Gertsakis, Chief Sustainability Officer for Infoactiv. John is also a member of the GlobalPSC Advisory Group

Clear and logical support grows for increased recycling targets under Australia’s National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (NTCRS).

Australia’s electronics recycling scheme is currently subject to an Operational Review by the Australian Government, and many stakeholders, including the Waste Management Association of Australia, are expecting the recycling targets to be sharply increased.

Anything other than a significant increase will continue to exacerbate stockpile creation, questionable recycling practices, and the appalling situation of Co-regulatory Arrangements (industry programs) terminating or minimising collection and recycling services to local councils across urban and regional Australia.

The NTCRS has achieved significant collection and recycling outcomes in a product category that was in urgent need of industry-wide Product Stewardship attention and industry support. The Product Stewardship Act and the subordinate regulations represent landmark policy reform aimed at applying the principles of Extended Producer Responsibility to unwanted, obsolete and end-of-life electronics. Infoactiv remains very supportive of the NTCRS and its achievements to date.

To view the remainder of John’s guest blog, click here.

 

GlobalPSC Members and Member Profiles

GlobalPSC members are listed here.

Member profiles and program updates are available here.

 

Events Update

The Global Product Stewardship Council is presenting at or participating in the following events:

At these events, we will be promoting the involvement of GlobalPSC members and our activities.

 

U.S. Supreme Court Paves Way for Drug Take-back Law

Posted by GlobalPSC in News at 2:53 pm, May 29th, 2015

iStock_000016423595LargeThe U.S. Supreme Court has decided not to hear a challenge to the constitutionality of Alameda County, California’s drug disposal law, which was the first of its kind in requiring drug manufacturers to fund and manage the safe disposal of unwanted medications.

The Supreme Court denied certiorari in a case brought by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), the Generic Pharmaceutical Association and the Biotechnology Industry Organization. The decision means that the Alameda County ordinance will stand, along with similar laws passed in San Francisco, California; San Mateo, California; and King County, Washington.

The Product Stewardship Institute has prepared a fact sheet exploring the implications of the Supreme Court decision and another fact sheet outlining the history behind the case.

Africa’s First Bottle-to-Bottle Recycling Plant Opens

Posted by GlobalPSC in News at 2:04 pm, May 29th, 2015

Africa Wadeville 3 Bagging stationAfrica’s first bottle-to-bottle recycling plant was officially opened this May by Minister of Environmental Affairs Edna Molewa in Wadeville, Johannesburg. The plant is the first in Africa to use a Coca-Cola approved technology for carbonated soft drink bottles, thus enabling closing the loop in the biggest sector of the beverage market.

The 3,000 square metre PhoenixPET plant installed by Extrupet will supply an additional 14,000 tonnes of PET resin per year to the PET packaging industry. It will eventually divert an additional 22,000 tonnes of post-consumer PET bottles from landfills. The plant involves investment of R75 million.

Minister Molewa was joined at the opening ceremony by notable guests from government and the PET industry including (L-R): Ravi Chanrai (Extrupet), Therese Gearhart (Coca-Cola Southern Africa), Laju Chanrai (Extrupet), Minister of Environmental Affairs Edna Molewa, Her Excellency Ruchi Ghanashyam (Indian High Commission), Cheri Scholtz (CEO of PETCO and GlobalPSC Advisory Group member), Vijay Naidoo (Extrupet), Randhir Jaiswal (Indian High Commission) and Chandru Wadhwani (Extrupet).

Wadeville Opening

PETCO CEO Cheri Scholtz notes, ‘The cooperation within the PET industry to reach a common goal of integrating recycling into product life cycles is showing very notable results: we have reached a point where 49% of all post-consumer PET bottles are currently recycled – no less than 1.5 billion bottles were recycled in 2014, supporting 44,000 informal income opportunities in PET collection’.

 

Call2Recycle 2014 Annual Report

Posted by GlobalPSC in Member Profiles at 4:20 pm, May 21st, 2015

20th Anniversary Badge

Call2Recycle®, North America’s most successful battery collection program, has released its 2014 Annual Report. Call2Recycle attributes their 20 years of growth directly back to the investment of time, money and ideas by their stewards, partners and stakeholders. Two historic milestones are noted for 2014: cumulative battery collections of 100 million pounds (45 million kilograms) and 18 years of year-over-year increases in the volume of batteries collected. Other highlights include:

  • In 2014, Call2Recycle diverted nearly 12 million pounds (5.4 million kilograms) of batteries and cellphones from landfills
  • Battery collections in California topped more than 1 million pounds (454,000 kilograms) for the 3rd straight year
  • Collections in Canada reached over 2.2 million kilograms (4.4 million pounds) of batteries collected, and the provinces of British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec recorded double-digit collection growth

 

Dana Peterson Appointed to GlobalPSC Advisory Group

Posted by GlobalPSC in News at 1:20 pm, May 21st, 2015

17979_GPSC_ADVISORY POWERPOINT SLIDE_FEB15We are proud to announce the appointment of an esteemed colleague, Dana Peterson, to the GlobalPSC Advisory Group.

The GlobalPSC and a number of our Executive Committee members have worked closely with Dana over the years, and she brings a wealth of experience to this new role on our Advisory Group.

Dana is a Senior Analyst with New Zealand’s Ministry for the Environment. She has been actively involved in promoting sustainability and resource efficiency in a variety of government roles since 1984. In 2012-2013 she was the government representative in two stakeholder-led product stewardship working parties, the Agrichemicals Review and Tyrewise, and in 2014 was the principal author of government’s public discussion document Priority Waste Streams for Product Stewardship Intervention. She has presented at a number of international conferences on product stewardship and sustainable procurement in Europe and Asia, and served as New Zealand’s representative on an OECD environmental management country review of Norway (focus on waste). At home, she does hands-on organic farming and native forest regeneration on 10 acres on the Kapiti Coast.

 

Guest Blog – E-waste Targets Must Go Up

Posted by GlobalPSC in Guest Blogs at 2:41 pm, May 14th, 2015

john_gertsakisThe Global Product Stewardship Council periodically invites thought leaders on product stewardship and producer responsibility to contribute guest blogs. Our guest blogger for this post is John Gertsakis, Chief Sustainability Officer for Infoactiv. John is also a member of the GlobalPSC Advisory Group

 

Clear and logical support grows for increased recycling targets under Australia’s National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (NTCRS).

Australia’s electronics recycling scheme is currently subject to an Operational Review by the Australian Government, and many stakeholders, including the Waste Management Association of Australia, are expecting the recycling targets to be sharply increased.

Anything other than a significant increase will continue to exacerbate stockpile creation, questionable recycling practices, and the appalling situation of Co-regulatory Arrangements (industry programs) terminating or minimising collection and recycling services to local councils across urban and regional Australia.

The NTCRS has achieved significant collection and recycling outcomes in a product category that was in urgent need of industry-wide Product Stewardship attention and industry support. The Product Stewardship Act and the subordinate regulations represent landmark policy reform aimed at applying the principles of Extended Producer Responsibility to unwanted, obsolete and end-of-life electronics. Infoactiv remains very supportive of the NTCRS and its achievements to date.

The majority of participating stakeholders wish to see the NTCRS expand and thrive as it continues to deliver measurable environmental, social and economic benefits. However the continuation of ‘easy-to reach’ recycling targets does nothing to demonstrate genuine CSR goals, nor do low targets address the vast volume of television and computer waste that continues to flood into landfills in all States and Territories.

We receive several calls each week from frustrated local councils that have had their collection and recycling service withdrawn by industry Arrangements under the NTCRS. And ‘frustrated’ is the polite translation of how they express their views. These are not isolated instances but a steady stream of municipalities who are now having to bear the cost burden of industry not recycling the very products that they produce and place on the market.

Most importantly, the Hon Greg Hunt MP, Minister for the Environment is perfectly placed to significantly increase the enforceable targets under the NTCRS and swiftly deal with several issues that require prompt and decisive attention.

Low-level target increases will continue to aggravate key issues at a time when the scheme needs proactive adjustment by the Australian Government. More information about the Government’s Operational Review that is currently underway can be found here.

Ongoing research and data collection by Planet Ark underscores the importance of the NTCRS given the number of public enquiries received every week wanting information about where and how to recycle unwanted televisions, computers and IT peripherals. Consumers, householders, small business and the wider public have clear expectations that manufacturers and brands in particular must play a greater role in managing the total product life cycle of their product beyond the point of sale and warranties. This merely reflects current activity in many other OECD countries.

In summary, Infoactiv believes that the NTCRS is a fundamentally sound and innovative scheme that addresses a significant and growing resource recovery imperative related to the consumption and disposal of television and IT equipment. The Department of the Environment is to be commended for its efforts in successfully launching and administering the NTCRS since inception in 2011.

Additional detail about our 10 point plan to adjust and improve the NTCRS can be found here.

We also recognise that any new, nationwide initiative such as the NTCRS will experience establishment phase glitches and minor hurdles, which only serve to inform the scheme’s long-term performance and success.

The Environment Minister’s option is very clear; sharply increase the enforceable collection targets, and do it swiftly. This will not only meet community expectation, it will also address the genuine needs of local councils nationwide, especially those that have been ignore by industry.

Most importantly, and often overlooked, is the unequivocal fact that a target increase under the NTCRS will further maximise resource recovery levels and better manage hazardous substances that are otherwise ending up in Australian landfills.

Losing such scarce and non-renewable resources at a time when the solution is available, obvious and uncomplicated would reflect poorly on the necessary policy reforms that are urgently required.

As always, greater public discussion about the NTCRS and how to achieve positive outcomes is welcome and encouraged.

The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Global Product Stewardship Council. 

John Gertsakis is a sustainability practitioner with over 20 years experience as an industry adviser, consultant and research academic. He works on a range of issues including Product Stewardship for electronics and EPR strategy, regulatory analysis, government relations and environmental communications. Through his current position as Chief Sustainability Officer with Infoactiv, John’s work is focused on strategic business development and the design of new stewardship solutions for manufactured durables.

John served as Executive Director of Product Stewardship Australia from 2006 – 2011, representing global consumer electronics brands and OEMs. He was deeply involved as a key advocate of the Product Stewardship Act 2011 and sat on the Implementation Working Group for the NTCRS. He authored Australia’s first report on e-waste product stewardship in 1995 titled: Short Circuiting Waste from Electronic Products. He was also the co-author and editor of Return to Sender: An Introduction to Extended Producer Responsibility (1997). John is also Vice President of the Australian Battery Recycling Initiative, and an Honorary Fellow of the Design Institute of Australia.

 

Consultation on New Zealand e-Waste Product Stewardship Draft Report

Posted by GlobalPSC in News at 12:40 pm, May 14th, 2015

The team developing an e-waste product stewardship framework for New Zealand has released a Draft Report to stakeholders for comment.

The report contains domestic and international issues for managing e-waste, stakeholder input, data analysis, options considered and a recommended framework.

Stakeholders are invited to email written comments on the #eWasteNZ Draft Report to ewasteNZ@slrconsulting.com by Friday 22 May 2015 in order to help inform a final version that will be submitted to the Ministry for the Environment for consideration. If any difficulties accessing the document arise, a PDF version is available by emailing ewasteNZ@slrconsulting.com.

 

GlobalPSC News – April 2015

Posted by GlobalPSC in Uncategorized at 4:44 pm, April 30th, 2015

New Zealand Feedback on Priority Waste Streams

The New Zealand Ministry for the Environment (MfE) has released a summary of submissions on its discussion paper on the prioritisation of waste streams for product stewardship intervention.

Stakeholders generally agreed with the MfE’s criteria for prioritisation but suggested weighting ‘risk of harm’ and ‘resource efficiency’ higher than other criteria. Stakeholders also generally agreed with the MfE’s proposed priority products (electronic and electrical equipment; tyres; agrichemicals and farm plastics; and refrigerants and other synthetic greenhouse gases), but recommended adding packaging and plastic bags for prioritisation.

Mike Mendonca of the MfE (pictured below) announced the summary’s release and reviewed its findings during the recent WasteMINZ Roundup in Auckland, which emphasised product stewardship. In a session with Mike and WasteMINZ Board Chair Darren Patterson, GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin outlined overseas developments in product stewardship and their implications for New Zealand.

GlobalPSC Advisory Group members Helen Lewis of Helen Lewis Research and John Gertsakis of Infoactiv were also active participants in the Roundup discussions, as was Paul-Antoine Bontinck of the Vinyl Council of Australia.

Public consultations on priority products opened in May 2014.  The GlobalPSC submission developed in conjunction with our Advisory Group is available to GlobalPSC members via our Knowledge Base, under the Frameworks and Harmonisation heading.

 

Australia Consults on Potential Regulatory Changes to TV and Computer Recycling Scheme

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The Australian Department of Environment is consulting on potential regulatory changes to the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme.

Possible changes include revised recovery targets, changes to conversion factors and scaling factors affecting liability under the scheme, and making the Australian Standard 5377 for the management and recycling of certain electrical and electronic items mandatory.

A brief discussion paper has been made available, and comments are invited until close of business 7 May, Australia time.

 

New GlobalPSC Members and Member Profiles

Member profiles and program updates are available here.

 

Events Update

The Global Product Stewardship Council is presenting at or participating in the following events:

At these events, we will be promoting the involvement of GlobalPSC members and our activities.

 

New Zealand Feedback on Priority Waste Streams

Posted by GlobalPSC in News at 4:22 pm, April 30th, 2015

The New Zealand Ministry for the Environment (MfE) has released a summary of submissions on its discussion paper on the prioritisation of waste streams for product stewardship intervention.

Stakeholders generally agreed with the MfE’s criteria for prioritisation but suggested weighting ‘risk of harm’ and ‘resource efficiency’ higher than other criteria. Stakeholders also generally agreed with the MfE’s proposed priority products (electronic and electrical equipment; tyres; agrichemicals and farm plastics; and refrigerants and other synthetic greenhouse gases), but recommended adding packaging and plastic bags for prioritisation.

Mike Mendonca of the MfE (pictured below) announced the summary’s release and reviewed its findings during the recent WasteMINZ Roundup in Auckland, which emphasised product stewardship. In a session with Mike and WasteMINZ Board Chair Darren Patterson, GlobalPSC CEO Russ Martin outlined overseas developments in product stewardship and their implications for New Zealand.

GlobalPSC Advisory Group members Helen Lewis of Helen Lewis Research and John Gertsakis of Infoactiv were also active participants in the Roundup discussions, as was Paul-Antoine Bontinck of the Vinyl Council of Australia.

Public consultations on priority products opened in May 2014.  The GlobalPSC submission developed in conjunction with our Advisory Group is available to GlobalPSC members via our Knowledge Base, under the Frameworks and Harmonisation heading.

 

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Global Product Stewardship Council

PO Box 755, Turramurra, NSW 2074, Australia
Tel: +61 2 9449 9909
Fax: +61 2 9449 9901
Email: info@globalpsc.net